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March 2020

Charleston Fishing Report – April 2020

By Fishing, Fishing Report

Charleston-Fishing-Report

Spring has arrived! With days full of sun and temperatures holding in the 70’s, our fishery is rapidly changing with many new signs of life. Trout and flounder are entering the mix and anglers now have several species to target instead of just spooky redfish. Bait is filling our waters and the fish are hungry!

Redfish are no longer focused simply on preservation but are becoming predators again. Anglers should consider using artificial plastic lures that mimic bait fish. One good choice would be “jerk shad” lures that have become very popular and are available in a wide variety of colors. I’ve been finding that silver hues have been working best although I’ll occasionally throw a darker color when water clarity is poor.

Having woken from their winter slumber, the trout are active again. Fishermen should focus on grassy banks and oyster beds when targeting these fish. It’s time to break out the popping corks again. Try fishing a 3” D.O.A. plastic shrimp lure suspended two feet underneath a popping cork. The D.O.A. shrimp come in several weights but I prefer their 1/4oz. model.  The Glow/Gold color is a great choice.

Often considered our tastiest fish, flounder are a frequent target. We’ve been catching them mostly when fishing with mud minnows on the bottom or mud minnows under popping corks. You’ll need to focus on structures when targeting flounder. Old pilings and docks are good places to prospect. Remember that flounder will hug the bottom in hopes of ambushing their prey, so you’ll need to keep that bait down on or close to the bottom.

See you on the water!

Kissing Redfish

By Fishing, Fishing Report

Charleston Fishing Guide

With wind and boat chop making the water on the flats muddy, we switched over to docks. Found redfish eating mud minnows on both sides of low tide. Bite stayed steady for several hours. Ting was so happy about one of the redfish they caught she decided to give it a kiss!

Seabrook Island Fishing

By Fishing, Fishing Report

Seabrook Island Fishing

Finally, a wonderfully sunny day with moderate wind! The Negrete family sure brought the good weather with them. Started at high tide and found no takers on mud minnows under corks. Once the water came out of the grass at mid-tide, the redfish would smoke the cut mullet in front of their path. Bella’s 26″ redfish was the highlight of a happy family trip.

Charleston Fishing Report – March 2020

By Fishing, Fishing Report

Charleston-Fishing-Report

Warmer weather is arriving in the Lowcountry and we’ve already seen a few days in the 70s. As the water temperature rises, trout and redfish will become more active. For all of you eager to get out on the water, the time has come!

Albeit starting to break up, redfish will still be in huge wintertime schools where you can easily find 50-100 fish in closely knit pods. To be successful, anglers will often have to be patient and fish bait on the bottom. Casting anything on these schools can send them fleeing! I’ll alternate between cracked blue crab, mud minnows and cut mullet on a size #3/0 circle hook. Set the drag lightly, leave your rod in the holder and let the fish set themselves.

It depends on the year as to when trout reappear. However, it has been so warm over the last few months, the trout bite is already in full swing. Popping corks cast over oyster beds and along grass banks will be a good bet paired when with mud minnows. I usually use a 24” leader and a size #1 circle hook. When working the popping cork, always try to keep slack out of your line and when that cork drops just reel tight to set the hook. Again, the circle hook will do most of the work for you.

This a prime time of year for fly fishing. Sight fishing abounds and stalking a school of a hundred plus fish is so exciting it can be nerve racking! Smaller flies in darker colors are working best and a black wiggler fly would be a good bet. Remember when the fish hits, resist the temptation to lift your rod tip and strip strike instead.

See you on the water!